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  • How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    HBR.org
    HBR IdeaCast
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas. Download this podcast
  • 420: How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    HBR IdeaCast
    Harvard Business Review
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas.
  • How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    HBR Blog Network Full Feed
    HBR IdeaCast
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas. Download this podcast
  • The Best Leaders “Talk the Walk”

    Bill Taylor on HarvardBusiness.org
    Bill Taylor
    7 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    One of the most ubiquitous aphorisms in business is that the best leaders understand the need to “walk the talk” — that is, their behavior and day-to-day actions have to match the aspirations they have for their colleagues and organization. But the more time I spend with game-changing innovators and high-performing companies, the more I appreciate the need for leaders to “talk the walk” — that is, to be able to explain, in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win. The only…
  • Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Rita McGrath
    Rita McGrath
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Organization as machine – this imagery from our industrial past continues to cast a long shadow over the way we think about management today. It isn’t the only deeply-held and rarely examined notion that affects how organizations are run. Managers still assume that stability is the normal state of affairs and change is the unusual state (a point I particularly challenge in The End of Competitive Advantage). Organizations still emphasize exploitation of existing advantages, driving a short-term orientation that many bemoan. (Short-term thinking has been charged with no less than a chronic…
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    HBR.org

  • How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    HBR IdeaCast
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas. Download this podcast
  • Publishing Is Not Dying

    Greg Satell
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    If marketers want to produce content, they need to think like publishers. After all, content isn’t an extension of marketing, it’s an extension of publishing. I am hardly the only one to make that case, but skeptics are still vocal in their disagreement. “Aren’t publishers failing?” they say. How can I hold up a struggling industry as a model? If publishing is a viable model, why aren’t publishers making money? These sentiments are common, but they are not based in fact. In truth, publishing is flourishing, creating massive new fortunes for entrepreneurs and more choices for…
  • Online Shopping Isn’t as Profitable as You Think

    Darrell Rigby
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:00 am
    When I argue that e-commerce isn’t likely to destroy innovative omnichannel retailers, I typically receive passionate responses. Am I really suggesting that the growth of e-commerce will slow before it annihilates most physical retailing? And how could I possibly argue that the economics of omnichannel retailers are as favorable as those of pure-play e-tailers? Growth rates first. Several organizations track e-commerce sales, including the U.S. Census Bureau, ComScore, eMarketer, and Forrester. All show similar trends. For example, Forrester’s data on the top 30 product categories…
  • Why Going All-In on Your Start-Up Might Not Be the Best Idea

    The Daily Stat
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    Entrepreneurs who give up their day jobs in stages are 33% less likely to fail in their start-ups than those who leave their jobs precipitously to run their new businesses full-time, according to a study of thousands of Americans by Joseph Raffiee and Jie Feng of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The staged approach, which allows entrepreneurs to gain important knowledge about their new businesses while phasing out their paying jobs, has become much easier with the rise of digital technologies that reduce the cost and time commitments of starting new companies, the authors say.
  • Why Marketers Want to Make You Cry

    Tim Halloran
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    “Hey – Dad? You want to have a catch?” Every time I watch Field of Dreams, there’s one scene that gets me. When Kevin Costner’s character asks his ghost father to throw a ball around, I – and a lot of other guys my age – dissolve. Chances are, the stories that stay with you also make you cry – or laugh – or get angry. The strong emotions make them memorable. Marketers are getting increasingly sophisticated at tapping into those strong emotions, and they don’t need a full-length feature film to do it. How many of you teared up – be honest – when you watched this…
 
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    HBR IdeaCast

  • 420: How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    Harvard Business Review
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas.
  • 419: Prevent Employees from Leaking Data

    Harvard Business Review
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:17 pm
    David Upton and Sadie Creese, both of Oxford, explain why the scariest threats are from insiders.
  • 418: The Condensed September 2014 Issue

    Harvard Business Review
    12 Aug 2014 | 3:07 pm
    Amy Bernstein, editor of HBR, offers executive summaries of the major features.
  • 417: The Art of Managing Science

    Harvard Business Review
    7 Aug 2014 | 3:23 pm
    J. Craig Venter, the biologist who led the effort to sequence human DNA, on unlocking the human genome and the importance of building extraordinary teams for long-term results.
  • 416: The Dangers of Confidence

    Harvard Business Review
    31 Jul 2014 | 2:55 pm
    Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, professor at University College London, on how confidence masks incompetence.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    HBR Blog Network Full Feed

  • How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    HBR IdeaCast
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas. Download this podcast
  • Publishing Is Not Dying

    Greg Satell
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    If marketers want to produce content, they need to think like publishers. After all, content isn’t an extension of marketing, it’s an extension of publishing. I am hardly the only one to make that case, but skeptics are still vocal in their disagreement. “Aren’t publishers failing?” they say. How can I hold up a struggling industry as a model? If publishing is a viable model, why aren’t publishers making money? These sentiments are common, but they are not based in fact. In truth, publishing is flourishing, creating massive new fortunes for entrepreneurs and more choices for…
  • Online Shopping Isn’t as Profitable as You Think

    Darrell Rigby
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:00 am
    When I argue that e-commerce isn’t likely to destroy innovative omnichannel retailers, I typically receive passionate responses. Am I really suggesting that the growth of e-commerce will slow before it annihilates most physical retailing? And how could I possibly argue that the economics of omnichannel retailers are as favorable as those of pure-play e-tailers? Growth rates first. Several organizations track e-commerce sales, including the U.S. Census Bureau, ComScore, eMarketer, and Forrester. All show similar trends. For example, Forrester’s data on the top 30 product categories…
  • Why Going All-In on Your Start-Up Might Not Be the Best Idea

    The Daily Stat
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    Entrepreneurs who give up their day jobs in stages are 33% less likely to fail in their start-ups than those who leave their jobs precipitously to run their new businesses full-time, according to a study of thousands of Americans by Joseph Raffiee and Jie Feng of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The staged approach, which allows entrepreneurs to gain important knowledge about their new businesses while phasing out their paying jobs, has become much easier with the rise of digital technologies that reduce the cost and time commitments of starting new companies, the authors say.
  • Why Marketers Want to Make You Cry

    Tim Halloran
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    “Hey – Dad? You want to have a catch?” Every time I watch Field of Dreams, there’s one scene that gets me. When Kevin Costner’s character asks his ghost father to throw a ball around, I – and a lot of other guys my age – dissolve. Chances are, the stories that stay with you also make you cry – or laugh – or get angry. The strong emotions make them memorable. Marketers are getting increasingly sophisticated at tapping into those strong emotions, and they don’t need a full-length feature film to do it. How many of you teared up – be honest – when you watched this…
 
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    Bill Taylor on HarvardBusiness.org

  • The Best Leaders “Talk the Walk”

    Bill Taylor
    7 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    One of the most ubiquitous aphorisms in business is that the best leaders understand the need to “walk the talk” — that is, their behavior and day-to-day actions have to match the aspirations they have for their colleagues and organization. But the more time I spend with game-changing innovators and high-performing companies, the more I appreciate the need for leaders to “talk the walk” — that is, to be able to explain, in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win. The only…
  • Why Amazon Is Copying Zappos and Paying Employees to Quit

    Bill Taylor
    14 Apr 2014 | 11:05 am
    Last week, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos released his annual letter to shareholders. As is the case every year, it is a tour de force of ideas and initiatives about the customer experience (Amazon Prime), disruptive technology (Fire TV), fast-growing product initiatives (Amazon Web Services), and strategic consistency. (As he does every year, Bezos attached his first letter to shareholders from back in 1997 to underscore the company’s long-term commitments.) Still, for all these big, cutting-edge innovations, it was a small, pre-existing idea, something that Amazon borrowed from one its…
  • Stop Me Before I “Innovate” Again!

    Bill Taylor
    6 Dec 2013 | 5:00 am
    The Wall Street Journal is out with a funny (and brutally honest) takedown of a word that has achieved almost-mythical status among business thinkers like me. That word is innovation, and it’s quickly losing whatever meaning it once had. Journal writer Dennis Berman begins by citing Kellogg CEO John Bryant, the respected head of a well-run company, who was describing one of its “innovations” for 2013. What was the game-changing, head-spinning new offering that Kellogg unveiled? The Gone Nutty! Peanut-butter Pop-Tart. That’s right, a world that has had to survive for decades with…
  • Pret a Manger Wants Happy Employees — And That’s OK

    Bill Taylor
    7 Nov 2013 | 5:00 am
    Last week, the front page of the New York Times carried an in-depth report on a “broad and transformative trend” in Russia. It had nothing to do with more democracy or less corruption. It had to do with better customer service — specifically, an intense focus inside Aeroflot, the infamous Russian airline, to teach flight attendants how to smile. “Anna, you just showed her the champagne bottle but didn’t say anything,” one instructor coaxed a young employee. “This is the silent service of Soviet times. You need to talk to her. And you need to smile and smile and smile.” I…
  • Playing It Safe Is Riskier than You Think

    Bill Taylor
    17 Sep 2013 | 6:00 am
    There are all sorts of reasons why so many big organizations can be slow to make changes that everyone agrees need to be made. “Our current margins are too good, even though the business is being eroded by new competitors.” “Our current products are still popular, even though a new generation of offerings is getting traction.” “Our current distribution system can’t reach the customers we need to reach to build a new business.” In other words, most leaders and organizations are really good at quantifying the risks of trying something bold or striking out in a new direction. What…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Rita McGrath

  • Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

    Rita McGrath
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Organization as machine – this imagery from our industrial past continues to cast a long shadow over the way we think about management today. It isn’t the only deeply-held and rarely examined notion that affects how organizations are run. Managers still assume that stability is the normal state of affairs and change is the unusual state (a point I particularly challenge in The End of Competitive Advantage). Organizations still emphasize exploitation of existing advantages, driving a short-term orientation that many bemoan. (Short-term thinking has been charged with no less than a chronic…
  • The Origins of Discovery-Driven Planning

    Rita McGrath
    29 May 2014 | 6:00 am
    When HBR asked us to write about the origins of discovery-driven planning, we had to laugh. It all started back in the mid-1990s, with Rita’s “flops” file – her collection of projects that had lost their parent company at least US$50 million. (Perfume from the people who make cheap plastic pens, anyone? How about vegetable-flavored Jello?) As we studied those failures, a pattern became clear to us. The projects were all being planned as if they were incremental innovations in a predictable setting: The assumption was that the organizations launching them had a rich platform of…
  • Research: Most Large Companies Can’t Maintain Their Revenue Streams

    Rita McGrath
    26 Dec 2013 | 6:00 am
    My research finds strong evidence that the majority of large companies do not successfully maintain their current revenue streams, let alone grow them over time. My “growth outliers” project looked at publicly traded firms with market capitalizations of greater than US 1 Billion as of 2009, using data from Capital IQ.  I found that in the period from 2000 to 2009, over half of the firms in the sample shrunk their revenue by 10% or more in at least one of those years, clear evidence of eroding competitive advantage. In that same study, there is also striking evidence of the rise of global…
  • The Pace of Technology Adoption is Speeding Up

    Rita McGrath
    25 Nov 2013 | 7:00 am
    Many people suggest that rates of new product introduction and adoption are speeding up, but is it really, across the board? The answer seems to be yes. An automobile industry trade consultant, for instance, observes that “Today, a typical automotive design cycle is approximately 24 to 36 months, which is much faster than the 60-month life cycle from five years ago.”  The chart below, created by Nicholas Felton of the New York Times, shows how long it took various categories of product, from electricity to the Internet, to achieve different penetration levels in US households.  It took…
  • Seizing Opportunities When Advantages Don't Last

    Rita McGrath
    29 May 2013 | 8:00 am
    I’ve been researching what allows companies to be successful even when their competitive advantages are short-lived — a phenomenon I call transient advantage. The Regus Group, Ltd., a company that provides many services but is best-known for its offices-for-rent business, is one of many I’ve been studying whose leaders seem comfortable that their current competitive advantages won’t last, and don’t waste too much time clinging on to them once competitors have caught up or the moment has passed.Their success is a great example of how companies can quickly get out…
 
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Andrew Winston

  • GE Is Avoiding Hard Choices About Ecomagination

    Andrew Winston
    1 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    After nine years, GE is taking its famous green initiative, ecomagination, into some complicated territory. This includes a new open innovation program that encourages ideas to reduce greenhouse gases from Canadian oil sands production — the same controversial, greenhouse-gas-heavy source of fossil fuels that environmental groups are fighting against when it comes to the Keystone XL pipeline. By stretching ecomagination into areas that many people clearly don’t consider very green, GE may be risking a valuable business and brand asset. Launched in 2005, ecomagination has always been a…
  • What Momentum on Climate Change Means for Business

    Andrew Winston
    1 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Climate change is real — as in actual, factual, and tangible. And it’s really expensive. This is the clear message from “Risky Business,” a new report issued by former U.S. treasury Secretaries such as Robert Rubin and Hank Paulson and other bigwigs like Michael Bloomberg. Their report is just one of many drumbeats for action on climate — drumbeats that have gotten much louder in recent weeks. Four former EPA chiefs, all Republicans, went to Congress to ask their party peers to take action, for example. And Hank Paulson, George W. Bush’s Treasury Secretary, recently wrote an…
  • Why You Need a Resilience Strategy Now

    Andrew Winston
    9 May 2014 | 5:00 am
    This past winter was a rough one for big swaths of the United States, with both unusual cold snaps and disruptive snowstorms. General Mills’ CEO recently blamed the winter for less-than-expected earnings, saying that “severe winter weather…disrupted plant operations and logistics…We lost 62 days of production…which hasn’t happened in decades. That would be the result of people not being able to get into work safely or not having inputs arrive.” It wasn’t just one company, though; the whole economy was slowed by the extremes and volatility we faced. The disruption to…
  • The One Thing Every Business Dies Without

    Andrew Winston
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    George Carlin always called people on their BS. He once railed against the idea of “saving the earth,” pointing out that the Earth will be fine with or without us. “The planet isn’t going anywhere. We are! … The planet’ll shake us off like a bad case of fleas.” All that would be left of us, he said, was maybe some Styrofoam. The idea that the earth needs humans to thank it and care for it is kind of funny. So Earth Day is kind of a quaint idea. And also strange to think that we might only value the spinning ball we’re totally reliant on for a single day each year. Imagine…
  • More CEOs Should Tell Anti-Environment Shareholders to Buzz Off

    Andrew Winston
    11 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    Apple CEO Tim Cook recently said something to a shareholder that you very rarely hear: take a hike. I’m paraphrasing, but only slightly. At the company’s latest shareholder meeting, a think tank, NCPPR, pushed Apple to stop pursuing environmental initiatives like investing in renewable energy. Cook went on a tirade — or at least what passes for one from the very cool and collected CEO. He made it clear that he makes choices for reasons beyond just the profit motive. As he put it, “If you only want me to make decisions that have a clear ROI, then you should get out of the…
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    Shoes Count

  • College Football Countdown | No. 11: Ohio State – USA TODAY

    21 Aug 2014 | 3:52 pm
    USA TODAY College Football Countdown | No. 11: Ohio StateUSA TODAYHelping matters are three enormous factors: one, a ridiculously good front four; two, the sense that the entire defense is just scratching the surface of its potential; and three, a very nice offseason hire in new co-coordinator Chris Ash, who should …Blueprint for How Ohio State Can Survive Braxton Miller's Injury in 2014Bleacher Reportall 945 news articles » ash shoes – Google News
  • We Bet You Don’t Know Where Your Favorite Shoes Came From – Huffington Post

    20 Aug 2014 | 9:44 pm
    We Bet You Don't Know Where Your Favorite Shoes Came FromHuffington PostBoat shoes came to be thanks to our four-legged friends. While almost everyone and their mother owns a pair of the comfortable shoe, few people know its interesting history. Never fear: here's a crash course on Sperry Top-Sider, the Massachusetts-based … sperry shoes – Google News
  • Walking in Your Shoes – Huffington Post

    20 Aug 2014 | 3:50 pm
    Walking in Your ShoesHuffington PostAs she slowly got more and more into the role of Bob, she was able to share feelings of frustration, perhaps even fears or concern. She was able to step momentarily into Bob's shoes and see reality from his perspective. When we stopped the exercise a … bobs shoes – Google News
  • Wader Fishermen Please Help! – BassResource.com (press release)

    19 Aug 2014 | 9:42 am
    Wader Fishermen Please Help!BassResource.com (press release)… to you when you put on waders. It's also so very cool having a big bass smack your lure just a few feet away from your legs. … Posted August 19 2014 – 10:53 AM. You'll have to decide on either a boot foot model or stocking foot with a pair of … bass shoes – Google News
  • Photographing The Most Challenging Mountains On Earth – Gizmodo

    18 Aug 2014 | 12:40 pm
    Photographing The Most Challenging Mountains On EarthGizmodoAs such, we were born into a family that spent all of its time in the mountains, skiing and climbing. As I went through ….. I believe that; having shoes or boots that are both light and warm (depending on your environment) is essential. If you're on …and more » born shoes – Google News
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