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  • How to Manage Scheduling Software Fairly

    HBR.org
    Ethan Bernstein
    2 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Starbucks workers recently scored a point against the machine. After a lengthy New York Times story, the company decided to adjust some of their controversial scheduling practices, eliminating “clopening” — when workers are required to close at night and re-open in the morning — and requiring at least a week’s notice of upcoming schedules. In this case, “the machine” refers to a real machine: the highly sophisticated automated software Starbucks uses to schedule its 130,000 baristas, sometimes giving them less than a few day’s notice about their schedules in…
  • 421: Privacy’s Shrinking Future

    HBR IdeaCast
    Harvard Business Review
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:01 am
    Scott Berinato, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, on how companies benefit from transparency about customer data.
  • A Predictive Analytics Primer

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Tom Davenport
    Tom Davenport
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    No one has the ability to capture and analyze data from the future. However, there is a way to predict the future using data from the past. It’s called predictive analytics, and organizations do it every day. Has your company, for example, developed a customer lifetime value (CLTV) measure? That’s using predictive analytics to determine how much a customer will buy from the company over time. Do you have a “next best offer” or product recommendation capability? That’s an analytical prediction of the product or service that your customer is most likely to buy next. Have you made a…
  • How to Manage Scheduling Software Fairly

    HBR Blog Network Full Feed
    Ethan Bernstein
    2 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Starbucks workers recently scored a point against the machine. After a lengthy New York Times story, the company decided to adjust some of their controversial scheduling practices, eliminating “clopening” — when workers are required to close at night and re-open in the morning — and requiring at least a week’s notice of upcoming schedules. In this case, “the machine” refers to a real machine: the highly sophisticated automated software Starbucks uses to schedule its 130,000 baristas, sometimes giving them less than a few day’s notice about their schedules in…
  • What to Do on Your First Day Back from Vacation

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Peter Bregman
    Peter Bregman
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You come back from vacation and start your game of catch-up. This is an especially challenging game if you’re a senior leader. You have hundreds, maybe thousands of emails, a backlog of voicemails, and a to-do list that doubled or tripled in length while you were away. You need to respond to the pent-up needs of clients, managers, colleagues, employees, and vendors. You need to fight fires. You need to regain control. So you do your best to work through the pileup, handling the most urgent items first, and within a few days, you’re caught up and ready to move forward. You’re back in…
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    HBR.org

  • How to Manage Scheduling Software Fairly

    Ethan Bernstein
    2 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Starbucks workers recently scored a point against the machine. After a lengthy New York Times story, the company decided to adjust some of their controversial scheduling practices, eliminating “clopening” — when workers are required to close at night and re-open in the morning — and requiring at least a week’s notice of upcoming schedules. In this case, “the machine” refers to a real machine: the highly sophisticated automated software Starbucks uses to schedule its 130,000 baristas, sometimes giving them less than a few day’s notice about their schedules in…
  • A Predictive Analytics Primer

    Tom Davenport
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    No one has the ability to capture and analyze data from the future. However, there is a way to predict the future using data from the past. It’s called predictive analytics, and organizations do it every day. Has your company, for example, developed a customer lifetime value (CLTV) measure? That’s using predictive analytics to determine how much a customer will buy from the company over time. Do you have a “next best offer” or product recommendation capability? That’s an analytical prediction of the product or service that your customer is most likely to buy next. Have you made a…
  • It’s Never Been More Lucrative to Be a Math-Loving People Person

    Nicole Torres
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Parents who spend a good chunk of the week shuttling kids to and from soccer practice or drama club might be comforted by new research that suggests this effort is not in vain – as long as their kids are good at math, too. A recent paper from UCSB found that the return on being good at math has gone up over the last few decades, as has the return on having high social skills (some combination of leadership, communication, and other interpersonal skills). But, the paper argues, the return on the two skills together has risen even faster. What does all that have to do with soccer practice?
  • Beware Consumers’ Assumptions About Your Green Products

    The Daily Stat
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    In an experiment, people expressed greater intentions to purchase a dish soap when they were told its environmental benefits were an “unintended side effect” of the product-development process, as opposed to a planned feature (5.65 versus 4.77 on a 9-point scale, on average), says a team led by George E. Newman of Yale. Results for other products were similar. The apparent reason: Consumers tend to assume that product enhancements in one dimension — such as environmental impact — come at the expense of performance on other dimensions.
  • What to Do on Your First Day Back from Vacation

    Peter Bregman
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You come back from vacation and start your game of catch-up. This is an especially challenging game if you’re a senior leader. You have hundreds, maybe thousands of emails, a backlog of voicemails, and a to-do list that doubled or tripled in length while you were away. You need to respond to the pent-up needs of clients, managers, colleagues, employees, and vendors. You need to fight fires. You need to regain control. So you do your best to work through the pileup, handling the most urgent items first, and within a few days, you’re caught up and ready to move forward. You’re back in…
 
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    HBR IdeaCast

  • 421: Privacy’s Shrinking Future

    Harvard Business Review
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:01 am
    Scott Berinato, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, on how companies benefit from transparency about customer data.
  • 420: How to Stop Corporate Inversions

    Harvard Business Review
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    Bill George and Mihir Desai, professors at Harvard Business School, explain why our corporate tax code is driving American business overseas.
  • 419: Prevent Employees from Leaking Data

    Harvard Business Review
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:17 pm
    David Upton and Sadie Creese, both of Oxford, explain why the scariest threats are from insiders.
  • 418: The Condensed September 2014 Issue

    Harvard Business Review
    12 Aug 2014 | 3:07 pm
    Amy Bernstein, editor of HBR, offers executive summaries of the major features.
  • 417: The Art of Managing Science

    Harvard Business Review
    7 Aug 2014 | 3:23 pm
    J. Craig Venter, the biologist who led the effort to sequence human DNA, on unlocking the human genome and the importance of building extraordinary teams for long-term results.
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Tom Davenport

  • A Predictive Analytics Primer

    Tom Davenport
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    No one has the ability to capture and analyze data from the future. However, there is a way to predict the future using data from the past. It’s called predictive analytics, and organizations do it every day. Has your company, for example, developed a customer lifetime value (CLTV) measure? That’s using predictive analytics to determine how much a customer will buy from the company over time. Do you have a “next best offer” or product recommendation capability? That’s an analytical prediction of the product or service that your customer is most likely to buy next. Have you made a…
  • 10 Kinds of Stories to Tell with Data

    Tom Davenport
    5 May 2014 | 9:00 am
    For almost a decade I have heard that good quantitative analysts can “tell a story with data.” Narrative is—along with visual analytics—an important way to communicate analytical results to non-analytical people. Very few people would question the value of such stories, but just knowing that they work is not much help to anyone trying to master the art of analytical storytelling. What’s needed is a framework for understanding the different kinds of stories that data and analytics can tell. If you don’t know what kind of story you want to tell, you probably won’t tell a good…
  • What Makes Big Data Projects Succeed

    Tom Davenport
    26 Mar 2014 | 9:00 am
    In conversations with executives, many of the same misconceptions about big data projects — and what makes them successful — keep coming up.  To help clear the air and foster a better understanding of what makes big data initiatives succeed, here are some of the key things I’ve learned from companies that are realizing substantial business value with their big data initiatives. Technology: The most popular misconception many organizations have is that big data projects are all about technologies that are specific to big data—Hadoop, Python, Pig, Hive, etc. It is certainly true that…
  • Book Publishing’s Big Data Future

    Tom Davenport
    3 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    The publishing industry is not one of the overachievers in terms of its use of big data. And since my book on big data—Big Data @ Work—is out, I thought it might be fun to speculate on what big data will do to the business of publishing books. The goal of any publisher is to get its content bought and read. In the past, publishers could know only if their books and magazines were bought, and knowing even that was problematic. With the advent of Nielsen’s Bookscan in 2001, publishers could begin to receive point of sale data from physical bookstores. Of course, physical bookstores, both…
  • Big Data and the Role of Intuition

    Tom Davenport
    24 Dec 2013 | 5:00 am
    Many people have asked me over the years about whether intuition has a role in the analytics and data-driven organization. I have always reassured them that there are plenty of places where intuition is still relevant. For example, a hypothesis is an intuition about what’s going on in the data you have about the world. The difference with analytics, of course, is that you don’t stop with the intuition — you test the hypothesis to learn whether your intuition is correct. Another place where intuition is found in analytical companies is in the choice of the business area where analytical…
 
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    HBR Blog Network Full Feed

  • How to Manage Scheduling Software Fairly

    Ethan Bernstein
    2 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Starbucks workers recently scored a point against the machine. After a lengthy New York Times story, the company decided to adjust some of their controversial scheduling practices, eliminating “clopening” — when workers are required to close at night and re-open in the morning — and requiring at least a week’s notice of upcoming schedules. In this case, “the machine” refers to a real machine: the highly sophisticated automated software Starbucks uses to schedule its 130,000 baristas, sometimes giving them less than a few day’s notice about their schedules in…
  • A Predictive Analytics Primer

    Tom Davenport
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    No one has the ability to capture and analyze data from the future. However, there is a way to predict the future using data from the past. It’s called predictive analytics, and organizations do it every day. Has your company, for example, developed a customer lifetime value (CLTV) measure? That’s using predictive analytics to determine how much a customer will buy from the company over time. Do you have a “next best offer” or product recommendation capability? That’s an analytical prediction of the product or service that your customer is most likely to buy next. Have you made a…
  • It’s Never Been More Lucrative to Be a Math-Loving People Person

    Nicole Torres
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Parents who spend a good chunk of the week shuttling kids to and from soccer practice or drama club might be comforted by new research that suggests this effort is not in vain – as long as their kids are good at math, too. A recent paper from UCSB found that the return on being good at math has gone up over the last few decades, as has the return on having high social skills (some combination of leadership, communication, and other interpersonal skills). But, the paper argues, the return on the two skills together has risen even faster. What does all that have to do with soccer practice?
  • Beware Consumers’ Assumptions About Your Green Products

    The Daily Stat
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    In an experiment, people expressed greater intentions to purchase a dish soap when they were told its environmental benefits were an “unintended side effect” of the product-development process, as opposed to a planned feature (5.65 versus 4.77 on a 9-point scale, on average), says a team led by George E. Newman of Yale. Results for other products were similar. The apparent reason: Consumers tend to assume that product enhancements in one dimension — such as environmental impact — come at the expense of performance on other dimensions.
  • What to Do on Your First Day Back from Vacation

    Peter Bregman
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You come back from vacation and start your game of catch-up. This is an especially challenging game if you’re a senior leader. You have hundreds, maybe thousands of emails, a backlog of voicemails, and a to-do list that doubled or tripled in length while you were away. You need to respond to the pent-up needs of clients, managers, colleagues, employees, and vendors. You need to fight fires. You need to regain control. So you do your best to work through the pileup, handling the most urgent items first, and within a few days, you’re caught up and ready to move forward. You’re back in…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Peter Bregman

  • What to Do on Your First Day Back from Vacation

    Peter Bregman
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You come back from vacation and start your game of catch-up. This is an especially challenging game if you’re a senior leader. You have hundreds, maybe thousands of emails, a backlog of voicemails, and a to-do list that doubled or tripled in length while you were away. You need to respond to the pent-up needs of clients, managers, colleagues, employees, and vendors. You need to fight fires. You need to regain control. So you do your best to work through the pileup, handling the most urgent items first, and within a few days, you’re caught up and ready to move forward. You’re back in…
  • Don’t Let Your Head Attack Your Heart

    Peter Bregman
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    I had been planning a dinner party for weeks. There were twenty people coming, some family, some friends, to celebrate my wife Eleanor’s birthday. I designed a ritual for her:  my goal was to create a space where people spoke from their hearts in a way they don’t usually do. I prepared questions I wanted us to explore together, questions like: What do you feel grateful for in your life? What new things do you feel are struggling to grow and be born in you? What do you want to let go of, so that the new can be born? Before I go any further, pause for a second, imagine yourself at the…
  • How to Start a Conversation You’re Dreading

    Peter Bregman
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    I anticipated that the conversation would be difficult. Shari* and I had worked together for many years, and I knew she was expecting me to hire her to run a leadership program for one of my clients, Ganta, a high-tech company. But I didn’t think Shari was the right fit for Ganta or, frankly, for the role of running the leadership training. In fact, I had become increasingly critical of her recent performance, though I hadn’t mentioned anything to her about it yet. That was my first mistake. I should have said something before it got to this point. So why didn’t I? I’d love to claim…
  • How to Have Friends at Work When You’re the Boss

    Peter Bregman
    19 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    Girish* is a client of mine who runs a 500-million-dollar business. He gets stellar reviews and is seen as a high potential successor to the CEO. But he has a friend problem. Several of his direct reports are close friends and he doesn’t hold them accountable in the same way he does his other direct reports. Often, they don’t do what he asks. And they aren’t delivering the results he expects. It’s hurting his business and his reputation. When I speak with others on his team about the situation, they see it clearly and resent Girish’s friends. They don’t understand why Girish…
  • The Best Way to Defuse Your Stress

    Peter Bregman
    24 Feb 2014 | 11:00 am
    I knew that I probably shouldn’t send the email I had just written. I wrote it in anger and frustration, and we all know that sending an email written in anger and frustration is, well, dumb. Still, I really wanted to send it. So I forwarded it to a friend, who knew the situation, with the subject line: Should I send this? She responded almost immediately: Don’t send it tonight. If you feel like you need to send it tonight, then I think it is for the wrong reasons. Make sense? Yep, I responded. Thanks. Three minutes later I sent it and bcc’d her. She was flabbergasted: You changed…
 
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    Bill Taylor on HarvardBusiness.org

  • The Best Leaders “Talk the Walk”

    Bill Taylor
    7 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    One of the most ubiquitous aphorisms in business is that the best leaders understand the need to “walk the talk” — that is, their behavior and day-to-day actions have to match the aspirations they have for their colleagues and organization. But the more time I spend with game-changing innovators and high-performing companies, the more I appreciate the need for leaders to “talk the walk” — that is, to be able to explain, in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win. The only…
  • Why Amazon Is Copying Zappos and Paying Employees to Quit

    Bill Taylor
    14 Apr 2014 | 11:05 am
    Last week, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos released his annual letter to shareholders. As is the case every year, it is a tour de force of ideas and initiatives about the customer experience (Amazon Prime), disruptive technology (Fire TV), fast-growing product initiatives (Amazon Web Services), and strategic consistency. (As he does every year, Bezos attached his first letter to shareholders from back in 1997 to underscore the company’s long-term commitments.) Still, for all these big, cutting-edge innovations, it was a small, pre-existing idea, something that Amazon borrowed from one its…
  • Stop Me Before I “Innovate” Again!

    Bill Taylor
    6 Dec 2013 | 5:00 am
    The Wall Street Journal is out with a funny (and brutally honest) takedown of a word that has achieved almost-mythical status among business thinkers like me. That word is innovation, and it’s quickly losing whatever meaning it once had. Journal writer Dennis Berman begins by citing Kellogg CEO John Bryant, the respected head of a well-run company, who was describing one of its “innovations” for 2013. What was the game-changing, head-spinning new offering that Kellogg unveiled? The Gone Nutty! Peanut-butter Pop-Tart. That’s right, a world that has had to survive for decades with…
  • Pret a Manger Wants Happy Employees — And That’s OK

    Bill Taylor
    7 Nov 2013 | 5:00 am
    Last week, the front page of the New York Times carried an in-depth report on a “broad and transformative trend” in Russia. It had nothing to do with more democracy or less corruption. It had to do with better customer service — specifically, an intense focus inside Aeroflot, the infamous Russian airline, to teach flight attendants how to smile. “Anna, you just showed her the champagne bottle but didn’t say anything,” one instructor coaxed a young employee. “This is the silent service of Soviet times. You need to talk to her. And you need to smile and smile and smile.” I…
  • Playing It Safe Is Riskier than You Think

    Bill Taylor
    17 Sep 2013 | 6:00 am
    There are all sorts of reasons why so many big organizations can be slow to make changes that everyone agrees need to be made. “Our current margins are too good, even though the business is being eroded by new competitors.” “Our current products are still popular, even though a new generation of offerings is getting traction.” “Our current distribution system can’t reach the customers we need to reach to build a new business.” In other words, most leaders and organizations are really good at quantifying the risks of trying something bold or striking out in a new direction. What…
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    Shoes Count

  • The fast fashion industry doesn’t want you to know about these things – Treehugger

    2 Sep 2014 | 8:53 pm
    Treehugger The fast fashion industry doesn't want you to know about these thingsTreehuggerThe Huffington Post recently posted a list of “5 Truths the Fashion Industry doesn't want you to know,” all of which are deeply disturbing (and yet not surprising) facts about the sketchy production methods behind those trendy-looking clothes on the … topshop shoes – Google News
  • Review: Sperry H2O Escape Bungee Sneaker – SFGate

    2 Sep 2014 | 11:44 am
    SFGate Review: Sperry H2O Escape Bungee SneakerSFGateWater shoes can be notoriously clunky, or have so many large openings to drain water that sand and rocks get in. The Sperry H2O Escape Bungee Sneaker is a far cry from the old-school leather boat shoes. These amphibious, super-light shoes weigh only … sperry shoes – Google News
  • Meijer, SKECHERS Donate 22500 Pairs of New Shoes to Detroit Area Children – SYS-CON Media (press release)

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:34 am
    Meijer, SKECHERS Donate 22500 Pairs of New Shoes to Detroit Area ChildrenSYS-CON Media (press release)GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Aug. 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Meijer, SKECHERS and K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers teamed up earlier this week to give away 2,000 new BOBS from SKECHERS shoes to Detroit children in need during a day of fun at the Detroit Zoo.and more » bobs shoes – Google News
  • Why liberals are more tolerant of atheists – CNN (blog)

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:41 am
    Why liberals are more tolerant of atheistsCNN (blog)(CNN) – Conservative atheist and television pundit S.E. Cupp has come out swinging against progressive atheists. In a clip (see above) for CNN's “Crossfire,” she argues that conservative atheists are “better” than liberal nonbelievers. What's more …and more » osiris shoes – Google News
  • Overland wins GH Bass Shoes licence in Europe – FashionUnited.co.uk

    30 Aug 2014 | 11:35 pm
    Overland wins GH Bass Shoes licence in EuropeFashionUnited.co.ukG-III Apparel Group has entered into a multi-year wholesale license agreement with British footwear distributor Overland to sell its men's, women's and children's footwear under G.H. Bass Shoes in Europe. Overland, which also has the global footwear …and more » bass shoes – Google News
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