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  • Oracle: The Worst-Governed, Best-Run Company Around

    HBR.org
    Justin Fox
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:53 am
    After 37 years in charge, Larry Ellison finally stepped down as Oracle’s CEO on Thursday. Except that he’s not really stepping down. The 70-year-old will stay on as the software giant’s executive chairman and also its chief technology officer — the latter title a formalization of a role he was already playing. And the new co-CEOs, Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, will continue to do the same things they did as co-presidents, the only difference being that they will now report to the board instead of just to Ellison. But Ellison is of course chairman of that board (long-time chairman Jeff…
  • 425: Fixing the College Grad Hiring Process

    HBR IdeaCast
    Harvard Business Review
    18 Sep 2014 | 3:43 pm
    Sanjeev Agrawal, Collegefeed cofounder and CEO, explains what recruiters, new graduates, and college career centers need to do differently.
  • A Predictive Analytics Primer

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Tom Davenport
    Tom Davenport
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    No one has the ability to capture and analyze data from the future. However, there is a way to predict the future using data from the past. It’s called predictive analytics, and organizations do it every day. Has your company, for example, developed a customer lifetime value (CLTV) measure? That’s using predictive analytics to determine how much a customer will buy from the company over time. Do you have a “next best offer” or product recommendation capability? That’s an analytical prediction of the product or service that your customer is most likely to buy next. Have you made a…
  • Oracle: The Worst-Governed, Best-Run Company Around

    HBR Blog Network Full Feed
    Justin Fox
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:53 am
    After 37 years in charge, Larry Ellison finally stepped down as Oracle’s CEO on Thursday. Except that he’s not really stepping down. The 70-year-old will stay on as the software giant’s executive chairman and also its chief technology officer — the latter title a formalization of a role he was already playing. And the new co-CEOs, Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, will continue to do the same things they did as co-presidents, the only difference being that they will now report to the board instead of just to Ellison. But Ellison is of course chairman of that board (long-time chairman Jeff…
  • The Chief Innovation Officer’s 100-Day Plan

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Scott Anthony
    Scott Anthony
    17 Sep 2014 | 10:00 am
    Congratulations! Your energy and track record of successfully launching high-impact initiatives scored you a plum role heading up innovation. Expectations are high, but some skeptics in the organization feel that innovation is an overhyped buzzword that doesn’t justify being a separate function. So, what can you do in your first 100 days to set things off on the right track? Over the past decade we’ve helped dozens of leaders through their first 100 days. Based on our experience, augmented by in-depth interviews with a few of the most seasoned practitioners with which we have worked, we…
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    HBR.org

  • Oracle: The Worst-Governed, Best-Run Company Around

    Justin Fox
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:53 am
    After 37 years in charge, Larry Ellison finally stepped down as Oracle’s CEO on Thursday. Except that he’s not really stepping down. The 70-year-old will stay on as the software giant’s executive chairman and also its chief technology officer — the latter title a formalization of a role he was already playing. And the new co-CEOs, Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, will continue to do the same things they did as co-presidents, the only difference being that they will now report to the board instead of just to Ellison. But Ellison is of course chairman of that board (long-time chairman Jeff…
  • Stop Searching for That Elusive Data Scientist

    Michael Schrage
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:00 am
    Based purely on the data, a really good data scientist will probably tell you the odds are poor that you’ll be able to find and hire really good data scientists. Surveys say there simply aren’t enough people with the unusual blend of software skills and statistical savvy to go around. Arguably even more important, high-impact data scientists bring collaborative temperaments and business acumen to data-driven initiatives. Unfortunately, there’s no shortage of individuals with just enough statistical and software knowledge to be data-dangerous. For many organizations, a…
  • Coaching an Employee Who Doesn’t Want Help

    Amy Gallo
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    Is there someone on your team who you’d like to coach, but resists your help? A high-performer who could reach further? A hard-worker who could grow faster?  The best managers know to coach their employees, but what if someone doesn’t want your help? How can you convince a hesitant employee that your advice is worthwhile? What the Experts Say “Resistance to coaching takes many forms,” says Amy Jen Su, managing partner of Isis Associates, an executive coaching and leadership development firm and coauthor of Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership…
  • Designing the Commute of the Future

    The Shortlist
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:55 am
    By Testing. And Testing Again. How San Francisco Is Designing Its Metro Train of the FutureCityLabThe first San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (commonly known as BART) trains first appeared more than 40 years ago to great fanfare. They haven't really changed since. But as Nate Berg reports, the system is on the cusp of change, with between 775 and 1,000 new cars scheduled to begin service in 2017, at a cost of up to $3.3 billion. So how, exactly, do you go about such a massive redesign, which will have profound implications for commuters throughout the city? For one, collect data and survey…
  • Will Oracle’s Co-CEO Setup Work?

    Walter Frick
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:33 am
    Larry Ellison announced yesterday that he was stepping down as CEO of Oracle, the company he co-founded in 1977. In his place, Oracle presidents Mark Hurd and Safra Catz will share the CEO role. Ellison will remain chairman of the board and will still serve as chief technology officer. Cue the Ellison retrospectives. But what about the company’s future? Can co-CEOs work? While research has found that the market seems to like the co-CEO arrangement, there isn’t a clear-cut answer on its effectiveness. But a paper published earlier this month at least presents evidence on how to…
 
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    HBR IdeaCast

  • 425: Fixing the College Grad Hiring Process

    Harvard Business Review
    18 Sep 2014 | 3:43 pm
    Sanjeev Agrawal, Collegefeed cofounder and CEO, explains what recruiters, new graduates, and college career centers need to do differently.
  • 424: How Silicon Valley Became Uncool

    Harvard Business Review
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:44 pm
    Walter Frick, HBR editor, explains why we valorize tech heroes from the past, but scoff at today's entrepreneurs.
  • 423: The Condensed October 2014 Issue

    Harvard Business Review
    9 Sep 2014 | 2:43 pm
    Amy Bernstein, editor of HBR, offers executive summaries of the major features.
  • 422: The Fall of the Talent Economy?

    Harvard Business Review
    4 Sep 2014 | 2:58 pm
    Roger Martin, former dean of the Rotman School of Management, on why talent's powerful economic position is unsustainable.​
  • 421: Privacy’s Shrinking Future

    Harvard Business Review
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:01 am
    Scott Berinato, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, on how companies benefit from transparency about customer data.
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Tom Davenport

  • A Predictive Analytics Primer

    Tom Davenport
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    No one has the ability to capture and analyze data from the future. However, there is a way to predict the future using data from the past. It’s called predictive analytics, and organizations do it every day. Has your company, for example, developed a customer lifetime value (CLTV) measure? That’s using predictive analytics to determine how much a customer will buy from the company over time. Do you have a “next best offer” or product recommendation capability? That’s an analytical prediction of the product or service that your customer is most likely to buy next. Have you made a…
  • 10 Kinds of Stories to Tell with Data

    Tom Davenport
    5 May 2014 | 9:00 am
    For almost a decade I have heard that good quantitative analysts can “tell a story with data.” Narrative is—along with visual analytics—an important way to communicate analytical results to non-analytical people. Very few people would question the value of such stories, but just knowing that they work is not much help to anyone trying to master the art of analytical storytelling. What’s needed is a framework for understanding the different kinds of stories that data and analytics can tell. If you don’t know what kind of story you want to tell, you probably won’t tell a good…
  • What Makes Big Data Projects Succeed

    Tom Davenport
    26 Mar 2014 | 9:00 am
    In conversations with executives, many of the same misconceptions about big data projects — and what makes them successful — keep coming up.  To help clear the air and foster a better understanding of what makes big data initiatives succeed, here are some of the key things I’ve learned from companies that are realizing substantial business value with their big data initiatives. Technology: The most popular misconception many organizations have is that big data projects are all about technologies that are specific to big data—Hadoop, Python, Pig, Hive, etc. It is certainly true that…
  • Book Publishing’s Big Data Future

    Tom Davenport
    3 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    The publishing industry is not one of the overachievers in terms of its use of big data. And since my book on big data—Big Data @ Work—is out, I thought it might be fun to speculate on what big data will do to the business of publishing books. The goal of any publisher is to get its content bought and read. In the past, publishers could know only if their books and magazines were bought, and knowing even that was problematic. With the advent of Nielsen’s Bookscan in 2001, publishers could begin to receive point of sale data from physical bookstores. Of course, physical bookstores, both…
  • Big Data and the Role of Intuition

    Tom Davenport
    24 Dec 2013 | 5:00 am
    Many people have asked me over the years about whether intuition has a role in the analytics and data-driven organization. I have always reassured them that there are plenty of places where intuition is still relevant. For example, a hypothesis is an intuition about what’s going on in the data you have about the world. The difference with analytics, of course, is that you don’t stop with the intuition — you test the hypothesis to learn whether your intuition is correct. Another place where intuition is found in analytical companies is in the choice of the business area where analytical…
 
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    HBR Blog Network Full Feed

  • Oracle: The Worst-Governed, Best-Run Company Around

    Justin Fox
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:53 am
    After 37 years in charge, Larry Ellison finally stepped down as Oracle’s CEO on Thursday. Except that he’s not really stepping down. The 70-year-old will stay on as the software giant’s executive chairman and also its chief technology officer — the latter title a formalization of a role he was already playing. And the new co-CEOs, Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, will continue to do the same things they did as co-presidents, the only difference being that they will now report to the board instead of just to Ellison. But Ellison is of course chairman of that board (long-time chairman Jeff…
  • Stop Searching for That Elusive Data Scientist

    Michael Schrage
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:00 am
    Based purely on the data, a really good data scientist will probably tell you the odds are poor that you’ll be able to find and hire really good data scientists. Surveys say there simply aren’t enough people with the unusual blend of software skills and statistical savvy to go around. Arguably even more important, high-impact data scientists bring collaborative temperaments and business acumen to data-driven initiatives. Unfortunately, there’s no shortage of individuals with just enough statistical and software knowledge to be data-dangerous. For many organizations, a…
  • Coaching an Employee Who Doesn’t Want Help

    Amy Gallo
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    Is there someone on your team who you’d like to coach, but resists your help? A high-performer who could reach further? A hard-worker who could grow faster?  The best managers know to coach their employees, but what if someone doesn’t want your help? How can you convince a hesitant employee that your advice is worthwhile? What the Experts Say “Resistance to coaching takes many forms,” says Amy Jen Su, managing partner of Isis Associates, an executive coaching and leadership development firm and coauthor of Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership…
  • Designing the Commute of the Future

    The Shortlist
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:55 am
    By Testing. And Testing Again. How San Francisco Is Designing Its Metro Train of the FutureCityLabThe first San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (commonly known as BART) trains first appeared more than 40 years ago to great fanfare. They haven't really changed since. But as Nate Berg reports, the system is on the cusp of change, with between 775 and 1,000 new cars scheduled to begin service in 2017, at a cost of up to $3.3 billion. So how, exactly, do you go about such a massive redesign, which will have profound implications for commuters throughout the city? For one, collect data and survey…
  • Will Oracle’s Co-CEO Setup Work?

    Walter Frick
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:33 am
    Larry Ellison announced yesterday that he was stepping down as CEO of Oracle, the company he co-founded in 1977. In his place, Oracle presidents Mark Hurd and Safra Catz will share the CEO role. Ellison will remain chairman of the board and will still serve as chief technology officer. Cue the Ellison retrospectives. But what about the company’s future? Can co-CEOs work? While research has found that the market seems to like the co-CEO arrangement, there isn’t a clear-cut answer on its effectiveness. But a paper published earlier this month at least presents evidence on how to…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Scott Anthony

  • The Chief Innovation Officer’s 100-Day Plan

    Scott Anthony
    17 Sep 2014 | 10:00 am
    Congratulations! Your energy and track record of successfully launching high-impact initiatives scored you a plum role heading up innovation. Expectations are high, but some skeptics in the organization feel that innovation is an overhyped buzzword that doesn’t justify being a separate function. So, what can you do in your first 100 days to set things off on the right track? Over the past decade we’ve helped dozens of leaders through their first 100 days. Based on our experience, augmented by in-depth interviews with a few of the most seasoned practitioners with which we have worked, we…
  • How to Market Test a New Idea

    Scott Anthony
    3 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    “So,” the executive sponsor of the new growth effort said. “What do we do now?” It was the end of a meeting reviewing progress on a promising initiative to bring a new health service to apartment dwellers in crowded, emerging-market cities. A significant portion of customers who had been shown a brochure describing the service had expressed interest in it. But would they actually buy it?  To find out, the company decided to test market the service in three roughly comparable apartment complexes over a 90-day period. Before the test began, team members working on the idea had built a…
  • Why Would Amazon Want to Sell a Mobile Phone?

    Scott Anthony
    16 Jun 2014 | 12:06 pm
    If you believe the rumors, Amazon.com is going to enter the mobile phone business this week, with most pundits guessing that a mysterious video suggest that it will release a phone with novel 3-D viewing capabilities. There are obvious reasons for Amazon to be eying the category. The mobile phone industry is massive, with close to 2 billion devices shipped annually and total spending on wireless-related services of more than $1.6 trillion across the world. As mobile devices increasingly serve as the center of the consumer’s world, their importance to a range of companies is increasing. What…
  • No Innovation Is Immediately Profitable

    Scott Anthony
    13 Jun 2014 | 8:00 am
    The meeting was going swimmingly.  The team had spent the past two months formulating what it thought was a high-potential disruptive idea. Now it was asking the business unit’s top brass to invest a relatively modest sum to begin to commercialize the concept. Team members had researched the market thoroughly. They had made a compelling case:  The idea addressed an important need that customers cared about. It used a unique asset that gave the company a leg up over competitors. It employed a business model that would make it very difficult for the current market leader to respond. The…
  • The Industries Apple Could Disrupt Next

    Scott Anthony
    4 Jun 2014 | 10:00 am
    After an unprecedented decade of growth, analysts wrote off 2013 as a year to forget for Apple. Most pundits agreed on what was wrong — a lack of breakthrough innovation since the passing of founder Steve Jobs. But in our view, Apple faces a deeper problem: the industries most susceptible to its unique disruptive formula are just too small to meet its growth needs. Apple has seemingly served as an anomaly to the theory of disruptive innovation. After all, it grew from $7 billion in 2003 to $171 billion in 2013 by entering established (albeit still-emerging) markets with superior products…
 
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Peter Bregman

  • Prevent Your Strategy Offsite from Being Meaningless

    Peter Bregman
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    I was facilitating the two-day executive offsite of a mid-sized technology company. The goal of the meeting was to solve major issues and identify potential opportunities that would guide their efforts, as a company, for the next year. We were halfway through the first day and, while everything was going according to plan, I couldn’t shake this nagging feeling that something wasn’t right. I struggled to put my finger on it. I took in the scene. The CEO and all his direct reports were sitting around the board room table and everyone was engaged. People were being respectful, listening to…
  • What to Do on Your First Day Back from Vacation

    Peter Bregman
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You come back from vacation and start your game of catch-up. This is an especially challenging game if you’re a senior leader. You have hundreds, maybe thousands of emails, a backlog of voicemails, and a to-do list that doubled or tripled in length while you were away. You need to respond to the pent-up needs of clients, managers, colleagues, employees, and vendors. You need to fight fires. You need to regain control. So you do your best to work through the pileup, handling the most urgent items first, and within a few days, you’re caught up and ready to move forward. You’re back in…
  • Don’t Let Your Head Attack Your Heart

    Peter Bregman
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    I had been planning a dinner party for weeks. There were twenty people coming, some family, some friends, to celebrate my wife Eleanor’s birthday. I designed a ritual for her:  my goal was to create a space where people spoke from their hearts in a way they don’t usually do. I prepared questions I wanted us to explore together, questions like: What do you feel grateful for in your life? What new things do you feel are struggling to grow and be born in you? What do you want to let go of, so that the new can be born? Before I go any further, pause for a second, imagine yourself at the…
  • How to Start a Conversation You’re Dreading

    Peter Bregman
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    I anticipated that the conversation would be difficult. Shari* and I had worked together for many years, and I knew she was expecting me to hire her to run a leadership program for one of my clients, Ganta, a high-tech company. But I didn’t think Shari was the right fit for Ganta or, frankly, for the role of running the leadership training. In fact, I had become increasingly critical of her recent performance, though I hadn’t mentioned anything to her about it yet. That was my first mistake. I should have said something before it got to this point. So why didn’t I? I’d love to claim…
  • How to Have Friends at Work When You’re the Boss

    Peter Bregman
    19 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    Girish* is a client of mine who runs a 500-million-dollar business. He gets stellar reviews and is seen as a high potential successor to the CEO. But he has a friend problem. Several of his direct reports are close friends and he doesn’t hold them accountable in the same way he does his other direct reports. Often, they don’t do what he asks. And they aren’t delivering the results he expects. It’s hurting his business and his reputation. When I speak with others on his team about the situation, they see it clearly and resent Girish’s friends. They don’t understand why Girish…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Dan Pallotta

  • The Ice Bucket Challenge Won’t Solve Charity’s Biggest Problem

    Dan Pallotta
    4 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    I love the Ice Bucket Challenge. Period. It’s a collective expression of love in a world with far too little of it. It has generated public tears in an age with far too few of them. It restores faith. It connects. And, as of last week, it raised more than $100 million for the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association, up from donations of $2.8 million for the same period last year. So, are we looking at the future of charity? We are glimpsing the potential of momentary collective engagement, but at the same time, we are seeing the confining rules by which nonprofits must play, collectively…
  • Be Kind to Your Employees, but Don’t Always Be Nice

    Dan Pallotta
    12 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    At 39, I was the CEO of a company with a few hundred employees. Depending on the day and the employee you asked, I’d rate anywhere from a zero to a seven on the unkindness scale (10 being a tyrant). I’d guess that I normally hovered around 4.5. I doubt anyone would have rated me a 10—that takes a particular kind of malevolence. I wasn’t taken to raging, other than on one occasion when the lives of the participants in our Montana AIDS Vaccine Ride (a 1,500-person, seven-day bike ride across the Rockies to fight the disease) were in jeopardy during a horrific mountain wind storm that…
  • Take a Walk, Sure, but Don’t Call It a Break

    Dan Pallotta
    27 Feb 2014 | 9:00 am
    Every weekday morning, I take a three-and-a-half mile walk around my neighborhood, in pretty much whatever weather my New England town throws at me. I split an apple and give half to each of the horses at the corner of Cross Street. The sounds of their chomps and slurps fill me with vicarious happiness. When I was a kid I walked to school every day with John Flaherty, Doug Casey, and Rollie Graham. At the end of the day, after debate practice, Bill Bailey, Paul Salamanca, and I would walk home. We never stopped talking for a minute, and we could have used another hour each day to say all that…
  • Nest and Google’s Customer Service Problem

    Dan Pallotta
    17 Jan 2014 | 7:37 am
    “…Google does not offer live customer support at this time…” That’s the recording you’ll eventually receive (after you’ve gone through two decision trees) if you call the Google headquarters phone number, the only number listed on Google’s “Contact Us” page. Really? Google—as in Android, Chromebook, Google Glass, Google TV—does not have live customer support? No, it doesn’t. Google’s intense focus on data and technology and advertisers since its founding meant that it didn’t need retail customer support. So not having it wasn’t really a problem. But…
  • What’s the Point of Creativity?

    Dan Pallotta
    9 Sep 2013 | 1:00 am
    Creativity and innovation are hot topics these days, and they are being studied more frequently and intensely. Great observations have come of the attention, as Will Burns writes for Forbes: A coffee-shop study from the University of Illinois concluded that moderate levels of noise, as opposed to high or low levels, foster greater creativity. A study from the University of Stuttgart found that low levels of lighting enhance creativity. And then there’s my favorite, another study from the University of Illinois, that concluded that alcohol intoxication improves creative problem solving.
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    Bill Taylor on HarvardBusiness.org

  • The Best Leaders Are Insatiable Learners

    Bill Taylor
    5 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Nearly a quarter century ago, at a gathering in Phoenix, Arizona, John W. Gardner delivered a speech that may be one of the most quietly influential speeches in the history of American business — a text that has been photocopied, passed along, underlined, and linked to by senior executives in some of the most important companies and organizations in the world. I wonder, though, how many of these leaders (and the business world more broadly) have truly embraced the lessons he shared that day. Gardner, who died in 2002 at the age of 89, was a legendary public intellectual and civic reformer…
  • The Best Leaders “Talk the Walk”

    Bill Taylor
    7 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    One of the most ubiquitous aphorisms in business is that the best leaders understand the need to “walk the talk” — that is, their behavior and day-to-day actions have to match the aspirations they have for their colleagues and organization. But the more time I spend with game-changing innovators and high-performing companies, the more I appreciate the need for leaders to “talk the walk” — that is, to be able to explain, in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win. The only…
  • Why Amazon Is Copying Zappos and Paying Employees to Quit

    Bill Taylor
    14 Apr 2014 | 11:05 am
    Last week, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos released his annual letter to shareholders. As is the case every year, it is a tour de force of ideas and initiatives about the customer experience (Amazon Prime), disruptive technology (Fire TV), fast-growing product initiatives (Amazon Web Services), and strategic consistency. (As he does every year, Bezos attached his first letter to shareholders from back in 1997 to underscore the company’s long-term commitments.) Still, for all these big, cutting-edge innovations, it was a small, pre-existing idea, something that Amazon borrowed from one its…
  • Stop Me Before I “Innovate” Again!

    Bill Taylor
    6 Dec 2013 | 5:00 am
    The Wall Street Journal is out with a funny (and brutally honest) takedown of a word that has achieved almost-mythical status among business thinkers like me. That word is innovation, and it’s quickly losing whatever meaning it once had. Journal writer Dennis Berman begins by citing Kellogg CEO John Bryant, the respected head of a well-run company, who was describing one of its “innovations” for 2013. What was the game-changing, head-spinning new offering that Kellogg unveiled? The Gone Nutty! Peanut-butter Pop-Tart. That’s right, a world that has had to survive for decades with…
  • Pret a Manger Wants Happy Employees — And That’s OK

    Bill Taylor
    7 Nov 2013 | 5:00 am
    Last week, the front page of the New York Times carried an in-depth report on a “broad and transformative trend” in Russia. It had nothing to do with more democracy or less corruption. It had to do with better customer service — specifically, an intense focus inside Aeroflot, the infamous Russian airline, to teach flight attendants how to smile. “Anna, you just showed her the champagne bottle but didn’t say anything,” one instructor coaxed a young employee. “This is the silent service of Soviet times. You need to talk to her. And you need to smile and smile and smile.” I…
 
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Rita McGrath

  • To Make Better Decisions, Combine Datasets

    Rita McGrath
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    A complicated system is somewhat like a complicated recipe. You know what the outcome will be because you understand what will cause what — combine a given number of ingredients together in a certain way, put them in the oven, and the results will be consistent as long as you repeat the same procedure each time. In a complex system, however, elements can potentially interact in different ways each time because they are interdependent. Take the airline control system—the outcomes it delivers vary tremendously by weather, equipment availability, time of day, and so on. So being able to…
  • Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

    Rita McGrath
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Organization as machine – this imagery from our industrial past continues to cast a long shadow over the way we think about management today. It isn’t the only deeply-held and rarely examined notion that affects how organizations are run. Managers still assume that stability is the normal state of affairs and change is the unusual state (a point I particularly challenge in The End of Competitive Advantage). Organizations still emphasize exploitation of existing advantages, driving a short-term orientation that many bemoan. (Short-term thinking has been charged with no less than a chronic…
  • The Origins of Discovery-Driven Planning

    Rita McGrath
    29 May 2014 | 6:00 am
    When HBR asked us to write about the origins of discovery-driven planning, we had to laugh. It all started back in the mid-1990s, with Rita’s “flops” file – her collection of projects that had lost their parent company at least US$50 million. (Perfume from the people who make cheap plastic pens, anyone? How about vegetable-flavored Jello?) As we studied those failures, a pattern became clear to us. The projects were all being planned as if they were incremental innovations in a predictable setting: The assumption was that the organizations launching them had a rich platform of…
  • Research: Most Large Companies Can’t Maintain Their Revenue Streams

    Rita McGrath
    26 Dec 2013 | 6:00 am
    My research finds strong evidence that the majority of large companies do not successfully maintain their current revenue streams, let alone grow them over time. My “growth outliers” project looked at publicly traded firms with market capitalizations of greater than US 1 Billion as of 2009, using data from Capital IQ.  I found that in the period from 2000 to 2009, over half of the firms in the sample shrunk their revenue by 10% or more in at least one of those years, clear evidence of eroding competitive advantage. In that same study, there is also striking evidence of the rise of global…
  • The Pace of Technology Adoption is Speeding Up

    Rita McGrath
    25 Nov 2013 | 7:00 am
    Many people suggest that rates of new product introduction and adoption are speeding up, but is it really, across the board? The answer seems to be yes. An automobile industry trade consultant, for instance, observes that “Today, a typical automotive design cycle is approximately 24 to 36 months, which is much faster than the 60-month life cycle from five years ago.”  The chart below, created by Nicholas Felton of the New York Times, shows how long it took various categories of product, from electricity to the Internet, to achieve different penetration levels in US households.  It took…
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    Shoes Count

  • The Complete Q&A: Charles Lloyd speaks, dreams – San Jose Mercury News

    20 Sep 2014 | 3:35 am
    The Complete Q&A: Charles Lloyd speaks, dreamsSan Jose Mercury NewsI would take my shoes off, and I would go up into the mountains and go down to the sea. I'd get a headache going into Carmel, because I was in …. Gabor (Szabo, the guitarist) and I used to race Ferraris. And you're probably too young to know about …and more » gabor shoes – Google News
  • Families searching for 2 missing Cibolo girls – KSAT San Antonio

    19 Sep 2014 | 11:31 pm
    KSAT San Antonio Families searching for 2 missing Cibolo girlsKSAT San AntonioMegan was wearing a bluish-gray three-quarter-length shirt, blue jeans, black Vans shoes and multicolored knotted brace'lets. Police said she was also carrying a black backpack. Police described Megan as a white girl standing 5 feet 6 inches tall and …and more » vans shoes – Google News
  • Cheap Uggi Shoes – Ugg Hartley Boots Genuine Ugg – Oman Daily Observer

    19 Sep 2014 | 9:31 pm
    Cheap Uggi Shoes – Ugg Hartley Boots Genuine UggOman Daily ObserverThe day office shoes uggs wasnt a total loss for Hahn. It is important to know that the dissertation takes place at the very end of the course, hence it starts when the student has completed all the portfolios of his course. All gays and visitors … office shoes – Google News
  • Ultra Music Festival Miami fashions: from go-go boots to tutus – MiamiHerald.com

    18 Sep 2014 | 10:37 pm
    Ultra Music Festival Miami fashions: from go-go boots to tutusMiamiHerald.comThe latest trends include high-waisted '80s-inspired shorts and leggings; flower-power headbands and tie dye T-shirts from the '60s and plenty of glitter with bold '70s disco makeup. Most wore flat boots or comfortable shoes from brands like Converse … vans shoes – Google News
  • Technology gets a makeover as fashion goes futuristic – CNN

    18 Sep 2014 | 6:43 pm
    CNN Technology gets a makeover as fashion goes futuristicCNNTopshop put digital at the heart of its London Fashion Week show by inviting influential bloggers to curate, for example. Chains are also embracing innovation through augmented reality … Marc Curtis, head of innovation labs at digital agency TMW …and more » topshop shoes – Google News
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