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  • Can You Be Too Rich?

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Umair Haque
    Umair Haque
    12 May 2014 | 6:00 am
    Is there such a thing as too rich? Like most reasonable people, I agree whole-heartedly that people who accomplish greater, worthier, nobler things should be rewarded more than those who don’t. I’m not the World’s Last Communist, shaking his fist atop Karl Marx’s grave at the very idea of riches. So. Perhaps I’ve asked an absurd question. Perhaps there’s no such thing as too rich — anywhere, ever. But try this thought experiment: Imagine that there’s a single person in the economy who is so rich he’s worth what everyone else is, combined. If there were such a person, he’d…
  • Can We Quantify the Value of Connected Devices?

    HBR.org
    Sunand Menon
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    In the 1990s, Procter & Gamble’s Product Supply Organization kicked off a major Reliability Engineering program, much like the efficiency initiatives of companies such as Toyota. They institutionalized the use of data collection systems in their manufacturing facilities to understand how products and machines would “behave” and could be optimized. By collecting machine failure data via manual sources as well as PLCs (programmable logic controllers), they were able to plot statistical distribution curves that predicted the failure rates of machines, along with the specific causes.
  • 430: Disrupting TV's Status Quo

    HBR IdeaCast
    Harvard Business Review
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:45 pm
    Famed producer Norman Lear on developing groundbreaking sitcoms, managing creative partnerships and the lessons he wants to pass on to the next generation.
  • Can We Quantify the Value of Connected Devices?

    HBR Blog Network Full Feed
    Sunand Menon
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    In the 1990s, Procter & Gamble’s Product Supply Organization kicked off a major Reliability Engineering program, much like the efficiency initiatives of companies such as Toyota. They institutionalized the use of data collection systems in their manufacturing facilities to understand how products and machines would “behave” and could be optimized. By collecting machine failure data via manual sources as well as PLCs (programmable logic controllers), they were able to plot statistical distribution curves that predicted the failure rates of machines, along with the specific causes.
  • What Successful Work and Life Integration Looks Like

    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Stew Friedman
    Stew Friedman
    7 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    Too many people believe that to achieve great things we must make brutal sacrifices, that to succeed in work we must focus single-mindedly, at the expense of everything else in life. Even those who reject the idea of a zero-sum game fall prey to a kind of binary thinking revealed by the term we use to describe the ideal lifestyle: “work/life balance.” The idea that “work” competes with “life” ignores that “life” is actually the intersection and interaction of four major domains: work, home, community, and the private self. From years of studying people in many different…
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    HBR.org

  • Can We Quantify the Value of Connected Devices?

    Sunand Menon
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    In the 1990s, Procter & Gamble’s Product Supply Organization kicked off a major Reliability Engineering program, much like the efficiency initiatives of companies such as Toyota. They institutionalized the use of data collection systems in their manufacturing facilities to understand how products and machines would “behave” and could be optimized. By collecting machine failure data via manual sources as well as PLCs (programmable logic controllers), they were able to plot statistical distribution curves that predicted the failure rates of machines, along with the specific causes.
  • Watch: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators

    Angelia Herrin
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you mastered the five skills that distinguish innovative entrepreneurs and executives from ordinary managers? In The Innovator’s DNA, co-authors Jeffrey Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton Christensen (The Innovator’s Dilemma, The Innovator’s Solution) built on what is known about disruptive innovation to show how individuals can develop the skills necessary to move from idea to impact. Through their research on the world’s best innovators—including leaders at Amazon, Apple, Google, Skype, and Virgin Group—these authors have identified five key skills that differentiate great…
  • What Apple Should Do with Its Massive Piles of Money

    William Lazonick
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    An Open Letter to Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Dear Mr. Cook, In a recent article posted on this website, I criticized Carl Icahn’s call for your company to intensify its stock buybacks. In this letter, I’d like to explain more fully why I view the $51 billion already spent by Apple on open market (including accelerated) share repurchases under your leadership as a major misallocation of resources for both the company and the U.S. economy. Unlike Mr. Icahn, I do not write to you as an Apple shareholder (I hold no Apple shares). Nor do I write as the satisfied Apple customer that I am. Rather, I…
  • Stop People from Wasting Your Time

    Dorie Clark
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    We’re all too busy, spending our days in back-to-back meetings and our nights feverishly responding to emails. (Adam Grant, a famously responsive Wharton professor, told me that on an “average day” he’ll spend 3-4 hours answering messages.) That’s why people who waste our time have become the scourge of modern business life, hampering our productivity and annoying us in the process. Sometimes it’s hard to escape, especially when the time-waster is your boss (one friend recalls a supervisor who “called meetings just to tell long, rambling stories about her college years” and…
  • Computer-Based Teaching Ends Up Being Costly and Risky for the Navy

    The Daily Stat
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    A decade ago, the U.S. Navy replaced instructor-led teaching with computer-based learning in entry-level training courses, in part to reduce costs, but the result has been less-well-trained sailors and an estimated $16 million in excess maintenance costs, say Robert M. McNab and Diana I. Angelis of the Defense Resources Management Institute. When such expenses as lost productivity and additional required education are factored in, computer-based training could end up costing hundreds of millions of dollars and endangering the fleet’s readiness, the researchers say.
 
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    HBR IdeaCast

  • 430: Disrupting TV's Status Quo

    Harvard Business Review
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:45 pm
    Famed producer Norman Lear on developing groundbreaking sitcoms, managing creative partnerships and the lessons he wants to pass on to the next generation.
  • 429: The Condensed November 2014 Issue

    Harvard Business Review
    14 Oct 2014 | 3:27 pm
    Amy Bernstein, editor of HBR, offers executive summaries of the major features.
  • 428: Focus More on Value Capture

    Harvard Business Review
    9 Oct 2014 | 4:02 pm
    Stefan Michel, professor at IMD, says your business should rethink how it captures value, not just how it creates it.
  • 427: Does Your Sales Team Know Your Strategy?

    Harvard Business Review
    2 Oct 2014 | 9:55 am
    Frank Cespedes, HBS professor and author of "Aligning Strategy and Sales," explains how to get the front line on board.
  • 426: How Google Manages Talent

    Harvard Business Review
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:22 pm
    Eric Schmidt, executive chairman, and Jonathan Rosenberg, former SVP of products, explain how the company manages their smart, creative team.
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    HBR Blog Network Full Feed

  • Can We Quantify the Value of Connected Devices?

    Sunand Menon
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    In the 1990s, Procter & Gamble’s Product Supply Organization kicked off a major Reliability Engineering program, much like the efficiency initiatives of companies such as Toyota. They institutionalized the use of data collection systems in their manufacturing facilities to understand how products and machines would “behave” and could be optimized. By collecting machine failure data via manual sources as well as PLCs (programmable logic controllers), they were able to plot statistical distribution curves that predicted the failure rates of machines, along with the specific causes.
  • Watch: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators

    Angelia Herrin
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you mastered the five skills that distinguish innovative entrepreneurs and executives from ordinary managers? In The Innovator’s DNA, co-authors Jeffrey Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton Christensen (The Innovator’s Dilemma, The Innovator’s Solution) built on what is known about disruptive innovation to show how individuals can develop the skills necessary to move from idea to impact. Through their research on the world’s best innovators—including leaders at Amazon, Apple, Google, Skype, and Virgin Group—these authors have identified five key skills that differentiate great…
  • What Apple Should Do with Its Massive Piles of Money

    William Lazonick
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    An Open Letter to Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Dear Mr. Cook, In a recent article posted on this website, I criticized Carl Icahn’s call for your company to intensify its stock buybacks. In this letter, I’d like to explain more fully why I view the $51 billion already spent by Apple on open market (including accelerated) share repurchases under your leadership as a major misallocation of resources for both the company and the U.S. economy. Unlike Mr. Icahn, I do not write to you as an Apple shareholder (I hold no Apple shares). Nor do I write as the satisfied Apple customer that I am. Rather, I…
  • Stop People from Wasting Your Time

    Dorie Clark
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    We’re all too busy, spending our days in back-to-back meetings and our nights feverishly responding to emails. (Adam Grant, a famously responsive Wharton professor, told me that on an “average day” he’ll spend 3-4 hours answering messages.) That’s why people who waste our time have become the scourge of modern business life, hampering our productivity and annoying us in the process. Sometimes it’s hard to escape, especially when the time-waster is your boss (one friend recalls a supervisor who “called meetings just to tell long, rambling stories about her college years” and…
  • Computer-Based Teaching Ends Up Being Costly and Risky for the Navy

    The Daily Stat
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    A decade ago, the U.S. Navy replaced instructor-led teaching with computer-based learning in entry-level training courses, in part to reduce costs, but the result has been less-well-trained sailors and an estimated $16 million in excess maintenance costs, say Robert M. McNab and Diana I. Angelis of the Defense Resources Management Institute. When such expenses as lost productivity and additional required education are factored in, computer-based training could end up costing hundreds of millions of dollars and endangering the fleet’s readiness, the researchers say.
 
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Stew Friedman

  • What Successful Work and Life Integration Looks Like

    Stew Friedman
    7 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    Too many people believe that to achieve great things we must make brutal sacrifices, that to succeed in work we must focus single-mindedly, at the expense of everything else in life. Even those who reject the idea of a zero-sum game fall prey to a kind of binary thinking revealed by the term we use to describe the ideal lifestyle: “work/life balance.” The idea that “work” competes with “life” ignores that “life” is actually the intersection and interaction of four major domains: work, home, community, and the private self. From years of studying people in many different…
  • Does Corporate America Finally Get What Working Parents Need?

    Stew Friedman
    27 Jun 2014 | 8:24 am
    At this week’s White House Summit on Working Families, President Obama and others made a moral case for changing the way we work. “Family leave, childcare, workplace flexibility, a decent wage – these are not frills, they are basic needs. They shouldn’t be bonuses. They should be part of our bottom line as a society,” the president remarked. Yet there was also a strong business case for change, with vociferous and impassioned representation from our nation’s private sector. Bob Moritz, PwC’s US Chairman and Senior Partner, called on his peers to make significant…
  • Working Dads Need “Me Time” Too

    Alyssa Westring
    13 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    Mother’s Day is widely recognized as a day to acknowledge moms who all-too-often forsake relaxation and self-care for the sake of family, work, and community responsibilities.  It’s no surprise that many Mother’s Day gifts are designed to give Mom one day to put herself first (e.g., sleeping in, a break from chores and cooking, getting a massage or pedicure).  Yet, as Father’s Day nears, few people acknowledge the fact that dads, too, are now increasingly engaged in childcare and household responsibilities, in addition to demanding jobs. Fathers are more likely than mothers to log…
  • Reduce Stress by Pursuing Four-Way Wins

    Stew Friedman
    3 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    The pendulum is finally swinging back from the apogee of complete immersion in work as the business ideal. A great hue and cry now strains to contain our out-of-control culture of overwork. We know it reduces productivity, destroys civic engagement, and produces all manner of stress-related health problems. The good news is that you can do something about it, for yourself and for your employees. You can be less stressed and more productive by spending less time on and less attention to work — while being more engaged with your family, your community, and the things you do for just you. You…
  • 7 Policy Changes America Needs So People Can Work and Have Kids

    Stew Friedman
    11 Nov 2013 | 10:00 am
    We are in the midst of a revolution in gender roles, both at work and at home. And when it comes to having children, the outlook is very different for those embarking on adulthood’s journey now than it was for the men and women who graduated a generation ago. I recently published research from the Wharton Work/Life Integration Project, comparing Wharton’s Classes of 1992 and 2012. One of the more surprising findings is that the rate of Wharton graduates who plan to have children has dropped by about half over the past 20 years. It’s worth noting that these percentages are…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Umair Haque

  • 3 Terrible Strategies for Companies Seeking Growth

    Umair Haque
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Some call it a depression. Some call it a never-ending recession. Some call it a disconnect or a decoupling. Some call it a not-quite recovery. Here’s the truth. Econ doesn’t have a word for whatever we’re in…because whatever we’re in flouts the so-called laws of economics. Quarterly results look great; job growth is “up;” and financial markets are ebullient. So why are so many still worse off than they were before? Why hasn’t all this “growth” actually translated into a real feeling of prosperity? And – as so many CEOs would like to know – is there any way to make…
  • Apple Is More Like a Band than a Company

    Umair Haque
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You’d think by now more companies would have learned. The tech industry still churns out beige boxes. The fashion industry, misshaped sack-shaped objects it calls “clothing” that make adult humans look suspiciously like overgrown toddlers. The food industry…who knows what’s really in the preservative-flavored genetically mutated stuff that’s labeled “food”? All the endless stuff the developed world is drowning in — that we’re melting down the planet to produce — is, for the most part, as unexciting as it is unoriginal as it is uninspired as it is…
  • Our Economic Malaise Is Fueling Political Extremism

    Umair Haque
    5 Jun 2014 | 12:00 pm
    The head of the fourth biggest and fastest rising political party in the world’s second most powerful economy is a racist. An aide to the Prime Minister of one of the world’s most promising societies is caught on camera kicking a protestor to the ground. The world’s largest democracy proudly elects a man who rode a wave of religious extremism. The head of yet another is a man whose calls for ethnic purity are becoming more strident. And that’s leaving out the rise of extremist parties in Greece, the U.S., France, and elsewhere. What’s going on here? Here’s my…
  • Can You Be Too Rich?

    Umair Haque
    12 May 2014 | 6:00 am
    Is there such a thing as too rich? Like most reasonable people, I agree whole-heartedly that people who accomplish greater, worthier, nobler things should be rewarded more than those who don’t. I’m not the World’s Last Communist, shaking his fist atop Karl Marx’s grave at the very idea of riches. So. Perhaps I’ve asked an absurd question. Perhaps there’s no such thing as too rich — anywhere, ever. But try this thought experiment: Imagine that there’s a single person in the economy who is so rich he’s worth what everyone else is, combined. If there were such a person, he’d…
  • 5 Dirty Secrets About the U.S. Economy

    Umair Haque
    2 May 2014 | 9:00 am
    If there’s one thing I hate these days, it’s discussing the U.S. economy. Will raising wages by seventeen cents destroy humanity? Will edible deodorant add 0.000007 percent to GDP? If we resurrected giant man-eating dinosaurs, could we use them to keep our warehouse pickers in line? Isn’t it awesome when the Dow hits a record high (but everything else flatlines or shrinks)? I feel like I’m listening to a debate on the noble merits of true love between the Real Housewives and a bunch of broseph PUAs. By my count, there are five dirty secrets about the economy we’re not supposed to…
 
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Peter Bregman

  • It’s Your Job to Tell the Hard Truths

    Peter Bregman
    17 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Rashid,* the CEO of a high-tech company and a client of mine for nearly a decade, called to tell me we had a major issue with some of the newer members of his leadership team. What comes to mind when you think of what might constitute a “major issue” with some senior leaders? Maybe they’re in a fight? Maybe they’re making poor strategic decisions? Perhaps they’re not following through on commitments they made about the business? Maybe they’re being abusive to their employees? Maybe they’re stealing? I’ve seen all of those problems in the past at various companies. But none of…
  • What to Do When Anger Takes Hold

    Peter Bregman
    1 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    I had just sat down to look over my calendar and plan my day when the phone rang. It was my contractor. Several of his workers were at my apartment ready to finish some work, but the building management company refused to let them in. This news made me furious. We have been renovating our small apartment, and it’s painfully over budget and six months overdue. During that time, the building management company’s mismanagement has cost me a tremendous amount of money and made an already difficult process even more agonizing. Now they were needlessly delaying the project again, this time…
  • Prevent Your Strategy Offsite from Being Meaningless

    Peter Bregman
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    I was facilitating the two-day executive offsite of a mid-sized technology company. The goal of the meeting was to solve major issues and identify potential opportunities that would guide their efforts, as a company, for the next year. We were halfway through the first day and, while everything was going according to plan, I couldn’t shake this nagging feeling that something wasn’t right. I struggled to put my finger on it. I took in the scene. The CEO and all his direct reports were sitting around the board room table and everyone was engaged. People were being respectful, listening to…
  • What to Do on Your First Day Back from Vacation

    Peter Bregman
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    You come back from vacation and start your game of catch-up. This is an especially challenging game if you’re a senior leader. You have hundreds, maybe thousands of emails, a backlog of voicemails, and a to-do list that doubled or tripled in length while you were away. You need to respond to the pent-up needs of clients, managers, colleagues, employees, and vendors. You need to fight fires. You need to regain control. So you do your best to work through the pileup, handling the most urgent items first, and within a few days, you’re caught up and ready to move forward. You’re back in…
  • Don’t Let Your Head Attack Your Heart

    Peter Bregman
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    I had been planning a dinner party for weeks. There were twenty people coming, some family, some friends, to celebrate my wife Eleanor’s birthday. I designed a ritual for her:  my goal was to create a space where people spoke from their hearts in a way they don’t usually do. I prepared questions I wanted us to explore together, questions like: What do you feel grateful for in your life? What new things do you feel are struggling to grow and be born in you? What do you want to let go of, so that the new can be born? Before I go any further, pause for a second, imagine yourself at the…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Sylvia Ann Hewlett

  • 4 Ways to Retain Gen Xers

    Sylvia Ann Hewlett
    24 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The economy’s slow but steady improvement should be good news. But employers may find a cloud lurking behind the sunny forecast: They are at risk of losing some of their most valuable talent — and they may not even realize it. These aren’t the usual suspects. Instead of the 50-something Baby Boomers and the Millennials in their late 20s and early 30s, I’m talking about Generation X, demography’s long-neglected “middle child.” Numbering just 46 million in the United States, Gen X is small compared to the 78 million Boomers and 70 million Millennials. Yet proportionate to…
  • The Authenticity Trap for Workers Who Are Not Straight, White Men

    Sylvia Ann Hewlett
    17 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    Many employees are encouraged to “just be yourself,” only to find their authenticity — and their career ambitions — constrained by unwritten office rules about appearance, speech, and behavior. Professionals of color, women, and LGBTs find there is a much narrower band of acceptance, and the constraints bite harder than wearing more polished outfits, getting a decent haircut, or even de-emphasizing an accent. Because senior leaders are overwhelmingly “pale and male” — professionals of color hold only 11% of executive positions in corporate America, women currently make up…
  • Flextime Is Declining, But “Flex Around the Edges” Is Up

    Sylvia Ann Hewlett
    20 Jun 2014 | 6:00 am
    Earlier this year, San Francisco and Vermont passed legislation that allows workers to ask for flexible work schedules without fear of reprisal. Are such “right to request” laws indicators of a rise in flextime? Or do they reflect a fear that flextime programs are being eliminated? The answer seems to be a confusing “both.” New research from the Families and Work Institute (FWI) and the Society for Human Resource Management finds an “on the one hand, on the other hand” contradiction. The good news is that some forms of flexibility — mostly allowing workers more control over…
  • As You Start Your Career, Focus on People Skills

    Sylvia Ann Hewlett
    29 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    All across the country, this year’s soon-to-be graduates are revving up to start their careers. You may be one of them. You’re already thinking about what you’ll do when get into your new position. You’re smart and energetic, and you’re eager to commit both of those attributes to moving ahead. But is that enough to succeed? Unfortunately, no. Brains only take you so far. Smarts get you through the gate, but everyone in your cohort of incoming hires has the hard skills required to qualify for the position. The fact is, the link between merit and success is forged through soft skills…
  • What’s Holding Women Back in Science and Technology Industries

    Sylvia Ann Hewlett
    13 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    Virginia Rometty at IBM. Marillyn Hewson at Lockheed Martin. Meg Whitman at HP. Ellen Kullman at DuPont. Marissa Mayer at Yahoo. Phebe Novakovic at General Dynamics. The presence of these women would imply that science, engineering, and technology (SET) industries welcome women. The fact is, senior female leaders in SET industries are still too few and far between. Even as these women blast open doors and blaze trails, new research (PDF) from the Center for Talent Innovation shows that U.S. women working in SET fields are 45% more likely than their male peers to leave the industry…
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    HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review » Andrew Winston

  • Two Forces Moving Business Closer to Climate Action

    Andrew Winston
    24 Sep 2014 | 9:35 am
    This week, CEOs and world leaders met at the UN to talk climate. In the run-up to these high-level talks, many companies and some relatively new voices from the business community have been sounding both the alarm and the rallying cry for action. At the same time, the cost of renewable energy has dropped very far, very fast. It’s a perfect storm bringing us to two important tipping points: one of belief and commitment to action, and one of economics. But there’s still a major disconnect happening in one other area: the relationship between business and citizen consumers. First,…
  • GE Is Avoiding Hard Choices About Ecomagination

    Andrew Winston
    1 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    After nine years, GE is taking its famous green initiative, ecomagination, into some complicated territory. This includes a new open innovation program that encourages ideas to reduce greenhouse gases from Canadian oil sands production — the same controversial, greenhouse-gas-heavy source of fossil fuels that environmental groups are fighting against when it comes to the Keystone XL pipeline. By stretching ecomagination into areas that many people clearly don’t consider very green, GE may be risking a valuable business and brand asset. Launched in 2005, ecomagination has always been a…
  • What Momentum on Climate Change Means for Business

    Andrew Winston
    1 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Climate change is real — as in actual, factual, and tangible. And it’s really expensive. This is the clear message from “Risky Business,” a new report issued by former U.S. treasury Secretaries such as Robert Rubin and Hank Paulson and other bigwigs like Michael Bloomberg. Their report is just one of many drumbeats for action on climate — drumbeats that have gotten much louder in recent weeks. Four former EPA chiefs, all Republicans, went to Congress to ask their party peers to take action, for example. And Hank Paulson, George W. Bush’s Treasury Secretary, recently wrote an…
  • Why You Need a Resilience Strategy Now

    Andrew Winston
    9 May 2014 | 5:00 am
    This past winter was a rough one for big swaths of the United States, with both unusual cold snaps and disruptive snowstorms. General Mills’ CEO recently blamed the winter for less-than-expected earnings, saying that “severe winter weather…disrupted plant operations and logistics…We lost 62 days of production…which hasn’t happened in decades. That would be the result of people not being able to get into work safely or not having inputs arrive.” It wasn’t just one company, though; the whole economy was slowed by the extremes and volatility we faced. The disruption to…
  • The One Thing Every Business Dies Without

    Andrew Winston
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    George Carlin always called people on their BS. He once railed against the idea of “saving the earth,” pointing out that the Earth will be fine with or without us. “The planet isn’t going anywhere. We are! … The planet’ll shake us off like a bad case of fleas.” All that would be left of us, he said, was maybe some Styrofoam. The idea that the earth needs humans to thank it and care for it is kind of funny. So Earth Day is kind of a quaint idea. And also strange to think that we might only value the spinning ball we’re totally reliant on for a single day each year. Imagine…
 
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    Shoes Count

  • Fab Five: Mannish shoes, for her – Vancouver Sun

    20 Oct 2014 | 2:36 pm
    Fab Five: Mannish shoes, for herVancouver SunThese top five mannish shoes help us do it in style. RED ALERT. Made by the Italian brand known for its comfortable, versatile shoes, these 'Promethea' masculine flats in maroon are the ideal way to amp up any casual outfit this fall. Geox, geox.com …
  • Vanderburgh Co. Sheriff’s Office donates shoes from 2011 shooting … – 14 News WFIE Evansville

    20 Oct 2014 | 1:33 pm
    Vanderburgh Co. Sheriff's Office donates shoes from 2011 shooting …14 News WFIE EvansvilleAn Evansville shooting investigation that began in 2011 lead to an arrest, a conviction, and an unusual donation. Back in October 2011, the Evansville Police Department responded to Fairmont Apartments on Tippecanoe Dr. in response to a shooting.and more »
  • Swiss luxury retail brand Bally boosts online presence in China with CDNetworks – Retail Gazette

    20 Oct 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Swiss luxury retail brand Bally boosts online presence in China with CDNetworksRetail GazetteBally was one of the first luxury brands to capitalize on the opportunities offered by the Chinese market. The country's high-income earners now spend more on luxury products than affluent consumers in any other market. Some 27% of all luxury shoes, …
  • Shoe Of The Week: Skechers GoRun Ultra Extreme – velonews.competitor.com

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:40 am
    velonews.competitor.com Shoe Of The Week: Skechers GoRun Ultra Extremevelonews.competitor.comSkechers updated its award-winning spring shoe with a weather-resistant upper for the fall. Fit-Feel-Ride: Built for running through inclement weather, this is a weatherized version of the award-winning GoRun Ultra trail shoe that debuted in the spring.
  • Vanderburgh Co. Sheriff’s Office donates shoes from 2011 shootin – 14NEWS … – 14 News WFIE Evansville

    19 Oct 2014 | 2:37 pm
    Vanderburgh Co. Sheriff's Office donates shoes from 2011 shootin – 14NEWS …14 News WFIE EvansvilleAn Evansville shooting investigation that began in 2011 lead to an arrest, a conviction, and an unusual donation. Back in October 2011, the Evansville Police Department responded to Fairmont Apartments on Tippecanoe Dr. in response to a shooting.and more »
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